The Obsolete Format of Media and Identity

Nick Gentry is part of a generation that grew up surrounded by obsolete media formats such as floppy disks, VHS tapes, polaroids and cassettes. Using these expired disk formats as the canvas for his portraits, Gentry helps the viewer identify with the consumable nature of culture, the recorded history of society and individuals, and at the very core, the impermanence of our identity.

New Masters

 

Subliminal Projects Gallery (Los Angeles, CA) is presenting New Masters, a group exhibition of works on the classical figure by contemporary artists Mary Jane Ansell, Sean Cheetham, Ron English, Benjamin Bryce Kelley, Miles ‘Mac’ MacGregor, Ann Marshall, Stephen Wright, and Jonathan Yeo, on view May 7, through June 4, 2011.

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August “Aesthetics” Bradley

August Bradley grew up in his mom’s photo studio, which started his studio photography training at a very young age. After countless hours in the dark room in high school and college, it’s inevitable that August makes such refined work as this. But only through the balance between his technique and conceptual skills does his photography stand apart.

 

Ageless Achievements

 

Dave Hobrecht is a master artist creating original artwork with obsessive detail and accuracy. Using his trademark technique – black&white charcoal painting – Hobrecht renders every polished detail with hand-crafted precision.

Hobrecht is pushing the limits of contemporary high-definition paintings and elevating his craft above the production value of photography. In each Hobrecht, the subject includes a historic (sporting) achievement. Hobrecht’s paintings enhances the viewer’s perception of the ageless perfection contained in “the moment.”

Hobrecht is passionate about art and his charismatic demeanor heightens the showmanship of his work.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dKcrCkbcDQ

Pink Procreation

Charlie White interprets the teenage female transformation of budding sexuality.

LOVE Backwards

“EVOL” is “LOVE” backwards, right? We’ve all heard this meme, but only a few of us have seen the street art created by the one who goes by EVOL. EVOL is a Berlin artist currently making work by pasting architectural photographs on banal urban surfaces. EVOL transforms electrical boxes, air conditioning units, planters, mailboxes and other geometric city forms into miniature buildings. EVOL often embellishes his structures with small characters peering out of the windows. EVOL’s work is now in different cities and he has been commissioned to do installations in galleries. EVOL has transformed entire blocks with miniature buildings and was featured in Berlin’s renowned ART magazine when it ran its first article on street art.

http://www.evoltaste.com/

“Timefy” goes “Up and Down”

The essence of Jonathan Calugi is noodles of obsessed line design twisted with talent. Look for the title of each piece incorporated typographically.

FromKeetra

FromKeetra (aka Keetra Dean Dixon) is a youthful, creative NYC designer and artist representing “the commercial” and “the pure.”

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Patricia Piccinini

The experimental Australian artist, Patricia Piccinini creates a blend of science fiction and fine art giving us a look at a future (or alternate reality) with human and non-human cohabitation.

 

“I sell forms and colors for a living”

That’s what New York City based artist, designer and technologist, Joshua Davis says about himself on twitter. But he’s selling his bio a little short. Davis uses unprecedented techniques and creates work that is 100% original. Davis’ work is inconceivably intricate and unique. So much so, that a highly trained craftsman or programmer couldn’t re-engineer his designs no matter how hard they tried – Davis’ artwork is the digital equivalent of a snowflake.

In order to create work at this caliber, Davis pioneered an art making process known as “Dynamic Abstraction,” which generates artwork from Flash-based computer programs. Davis writes these computer programs based in Chaos Theory, which then execute random patterns of his hand drawn artwork. Davis calls this process, “Computational Design,” and he names his body of work “Tropism,” which is defined as the innate tendency of living organisms to move or grow without cognitive thought.

One of the biggest artistic influences for Davis is Jackson Pollock. Davis said, “I like Jackson Pollock. I don’t necessarily like his work, but I like Pollock as an idea.” The resonating idea is that Pollock’s paintings aren’t derived from a concept nor deliberate control of the paint or brush. Pollock (and Davis) initiate and “own” the finished work that they create, but the artists are only vehicles for the chance and movement that they cannot control.

“Tropism” at it’s best.

Following Pollock’s example, Davis loses control when he makes his art. In return, both artists make original, unrepeatable pieces. Davis’ computational design programs are randomized and unencumbered with very little restrictions, so the programs generate visual products of pure chance. Pollock’s fortuitous paintings are also produced by unplanned movements with limited controls such as the canvas frame, media, pigment color, and time duration.

When making artwork, Davis plays three roles – “the programmer, the designer, and the critic.” The critic, he says is the hard part because he’ll sometimes run a program 300-500 times before arriving at the result he wants. He mentioned running a program for 2 weeks before he saw the perfectly rendered design of his liking – a final result that “suspends chaos in a state of harmony… like waiting for that beautiful accident.”

Apple describes Davis as Infinitely Interesting and “abduzeedo’s blog” names him as a design legend. Follow Joshua Davis on

Twitter @joshuadavis or check him out on Flickr.

The “Beast” from Down Under

Sydney based artist, Brad Eastman, aka “Beastman” is one of Australia’s most widely recognized emerging artists. His distinct graphic aesthetic uses bold, saturated colors outlined with heavy black strokes. Beastman’s refined technique depict monstrous creatures reminiscent of a child’s imagination. Many of Beastman’s creatures stare back at the viewer with open eyes and razor-toothed mouths ready to devour.

Women of a Different Age

At the Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena, CA, there are many bronze sculptures depicting women. These sculptures aren’t representative of a specific woman such as Mary Magdalene or Mother Teresa. Instead, the Norton Simon female sculptures offer specific viewpoints about the female form as a concept. When we investigate the concept of the female form, questions arise such as, What is femininity? What defines the female form? What is “woman”?

Graciously, the bronze female statues at the Norton Simon Museum offer various viewpoints to these questions.

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