The Long Awaited and The Foundling, ©Patricia Piccinini - Silicone, fiberglass, human hair, leather, plywood, clothing. 152x80x92cmThe Young Family, ©Patricia Piccinini - Silicone, acrylic, human hair, leather, timber. 80x150x110cm

Patricia Piccinini

The experimental Australian artist, Patricia Piccinini creates a blend of science fiction and fine art giving us a look at a future (or alternate reality) with human and non-human cohabitation.

 

A Camp Near Minsk, 1941 ©Agan HarahapCherbourg-Normandy, 1944 ©Agan HarahapGreenham Airfield, June 5, 1944 ©Agan HarahapNeuschwanstein, 1945 ©Agan HarahapYalta Conference, February 1945

Evil Villains and Super Heros

Agan Harahap claims that he is a wildlife photographer. There is very little known about him beyond this. He also claims that he loves history, which is evident in his “Super Hero” collection.

Shigeo Fukuda

Shigeo Fukuda / Fukuda San (1932 – 2009)

In the video below, Shigeo Fukuda’s sculpture appears as an assembled mass of welded forks, knives, and spoons. Eventually, the shadowy form of the intended work unveils itself and leaves a glimpse of Fukuda’s concept.

      “…Traditionally, Japanese designers looked to the West for innovative solutions. This is no longer the case. The winds are shifting toward an easterly direction. Shigeo Fukuda, Japan’s Houdini of Design, is a welcome part of the shifting breeze. His visual originality and deep dedication to worthwhile causes help keep the sun shining brightly over our ever changing, complex world.” — excerpt from biography by

The Art Directors Club

    (c. 1987)
    Shigeo Fukuda was a sculptor, designer and optical illusionist. He was also the first Japanese designer inducted into the Art Directors Club Hall of Fame.
©Shigeo Fukuda

©Shigeo Fukuda

©Shigeo Fukuda

©Shigeo Fukuda

Victory 1945  ©Shigeo Fukuda

Victory 1945 ©Shigeo Fukuda

©Shigeo Fukuda

©Shigeo Fukuda

©Shigeo Fukuda

©Shigeo Fukuda

©Shigeo Fukuda

©Shigeo Fukuda

©Shigeo Fukuda

©Shigeo Fukuda

Archimedean Point

I.M. Pei-designed contemporary art museum, MUDAM has a new solo exhibit, dubbed “Archimedean Point” featuring Hungarian artist Attila Csörgö. Csörgö work explores the intersection of science and art, where experiments turn the immaterial and unimagined into physical forms. Archimedes would be proud of Attila’s “designs” which are innovative sculptures based in science, physics and mathematics. “Archimedean Point” is curated by Kati Simon (Ludwig Múzeum Budapest). Photos are courtesy of MUDAM and Attila Csörgö.

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"4ZZZ building mural" - brisbane - august 2010 ©beastman"give a trunk" - monster children, sydney - february 2010 ©beastman"infinite nature" - gorker gallery, melbourne - july/august 2010 ©beastman"on the prowl" acrylic & ink on 18"x18" mounted plywood panel ©beastman

The "Beast" from Down Under

Sydney based artist, Brad Eastman, aka “Beastman” is one of Australia’s most widely recognized emerging artists. His distinct graphic aesthetic uses bold, saturated colors outlined with heavy black strokes. Beastman’s refined technique depict monstrous creatures reminiscent of a child’s imagination. Many of Beastman’s creatures stare back at the viewer with open eyes and razor-toothed mouths ready to devour.

What's the Point?

Dalton Ghetti has perfected his craft of micro-sculptures and generated a viral email campaign with his work. However, after you view his artwork and then perhaps paid it forward by writing a blog post, tweeted or forwarded it on to a friend, is there an answer to the quintessential question every artist faces… “What’s the point?”

In Dalton Ghetti’s situation, the answer might be hiding in the point of a #2 pencil, but after close inspection, I have yet to find any meaning beyond the tenor of those “artists” who can write your name on a grain of sand.

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"Hyperphotos" by Jean Francois Rauzier

Below is a full frame image and a detailed snippet from one of  Jean Francois Rauzier’s “hyperphotos.”  Jean Rauzier’s “hyperphotos” are comprised of “600-3,400 individual photos,” so at this size it doesn’t do the work much justice. However, if you continue on to Rauzier’s website you’ll be intrigued by the level of depth and detail in every image.

The completed photos are documents of real places. Based on Rauzier’s process of documenting a single location with multiple images, Rauzier’s work has been compared to David Hockney’s stitched photographic scenes, although the Rauzier’s finished product is a seamlessly tiled image with clean edges throughout the entire composition.

For more of his work, please visit Rauzier’s website.

Full frame of "Citadelle 2" by Jean Razier

Full frame of "Citadelle 2" by Jean Razier

detail of "Citadelle 2" by Jean Razier

detail of "Citadelle 2" by Jean Razier

David Hockney "Pearblossom Hwy., 11-18th April 1986, #2" getty.edu

David Hockney "Pearblossom Hwy., 11-18th April 1986, #2" getty.edu

Mask of Greed

We all wear “masks” and beneath the surface there are alternate faces and personalities lurking.

LA Artist’s Map: The Evan Holloway system

Artist, Evan Holloway enjoys “mapping.” In this piece, “Relative Frequency” made in ’08, Mr. Holloway mapped every letter of the alphabet based on the frequency that the letters are used in the English language. Around the circumference of an inner tube, Holloway placed the letters equidistant from each other and then suspended the inner tube around a vertical pole painted with 27 different colors. Based on the usage frequency of each letter there is a string tied from the letter to the corresponding color. The lines connect to the letter’s usage in language and the piece becomes a map of the alphabet.

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It makes us see…

“Art does not reproduce what we see; rather, it makes us see.” – Paul Klee

"Meat" the Artist

Long before viewing Dimitri Tsykalov carnivorous creations, I decided that the vegetarian lifestyle was right for me. Whether or not you’ve resolved to alter your eating habits since being born into the predisposition of an omnivorous society, deciding if you want to consume Tsykalov’s artwork should be an easy conclusion.

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