Product Placement

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Around 1967 when text was first digitized, the pixel rendering of text allowed for the combination of images and texts to merge. Prior to this, images could only be applied to the edges of text pages. Since then, images and text have been inextricably woven together with the same rendering technology.

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Stand for Change

With tears in my eyes, I watched this video and thought Macklemore was speaking directly to the essence of my spiritual pursuit.

Dior Homme – Fashion Video

Fashion Video is an emerging genre of brand communication that advertises the product through an alternative story telling strategy.

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Lego Lust

In 2009, James Sherrett, on ADHACK wrote that he likes LEGO and doesn’t want to stop liking LEGO, but this campaign makes him feel creepy.

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©August Bradley©August Bradley

August "Aesthetics" Bradley

August Bradley grew up in his mom’s photo studio, which started his studio photography training at a very young age. After countless hours in the dark room in high school and college, it’s inevitable that August makes such refined work as this. But only through the balance between his technique and conceptual skills does his photography stand apart.

 

Red, Yellow, Green

DJ Cheeba performs an exclusive live mix using Beck’s Vier beer taps to trigger audio samples and lighting effects across a grid of 600 LED-lit Beck’s bottles.

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"Ride" – Keep the Dream Alive

We are left standing atop a building, high above the urban sprawl of a faceless city. We see the flames of passion on his back and his words call out to us. “You have experiences, and the experiences you have in life are just lessons… Keep that dream in your mind alive.”

Watch this short film, “Ride” directed by Garth Davis, featuring pro skater Steve Berra and a band of his skate buddies as they light up the streets of Mexico city with fearless abandonment. If the sponsoring company Burn, a Coca-Cola energy drink continues making commercials with such artistic sensibility, that’s good news for our ad-assaulted brains and marketing-deadened eyes. “Artbranding” at its best.

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Y now? Y not.

Jason Ryan Dorsey, The Gen-Y Guy, stepped to the mic and began his canned “lecture-performance.” With high energy and lively stories, Dorsey explains that understanding the main characteristics of each generation is crucial for effective communication. Dorsey furthers that there are proper methods of communicating based on the distinct ways each generation acts, feels, and thinks. Dorsey contends that each generation – Gen-Y, Gen-X, Baby Boomers, and Matures – have unique ways of interacting and communicating, and it is especially important in today’s age to understand and relate properly with Gen–Y. But Y now?

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sak_floral_001 ©Joshua DavisMotorola KRZR ©Joshua Davisa better tommorrow ©Joshua Davisaim high keep moving ©Joshua Davisholiday reflection 02 ©Joshua Davismatika magazine 01 ©Joshua DavisMotorola KRZR ©Joshua Davis©Jackson Pollock

"I sell forms and colors for a living"

That’s what New York City based artist, designer and technologist, Joshua Davis says about himself on twitter. But he’s selling his bio a little short. Davis uses unprecedented techniques and creates work that is 100% original. Davis’ work is inconceivably intricate and unique. So much so, that a highly trained craftsman or programmer couldn’t re-engineer his designs no matter how hard they tried – Davis’ artwork is the digital equivalent of a snowflake.

In order to create work at this caliber, Davis pioneered an art making process known as “Dynamic Abstraction,” which generates artwork from Flash-based computer programs. Davis writes these computer programs based in Chaos Theory, which then execute random patterns of his hand drawn artwork. Davis calls this process, “Computational Design,” and he names his body of work “Tropism,” which is defined as the innate tendency of living organisms to move or grow without cognitive thought.

One of the biggest artistic influences for Davis is Jackson Pollock. Davis said, “I like Jackson Pollock. I don’t necessarily like his work, but I like Pollock as an idea.” The resonating idea is that Pollock’s paintings aren’t derived from a concept nor deliberate control of the paint or brush. Pollock (and Davis) initiate and “own” the finished work that they create, but the artists are only vehicles for the chance and movement that they cannot control.

“Tropism” at it’s best.

Following Pollock’s example, Davis loses control when he makes his art. In return, both artists make original, unrepeatable pieces. Davis’ computational design programs are randomized and unencumbered with very little restrictions, so the programs generate visual products of pure chance. Pollock’s fortuitous paintings are also produced by unplanned movements with limited controls such as the canvas frame, media, pigment color, and time duration.

When making artwork, Davis plays three roles – “the programmer, the designer, and the critic.” The critic, he says is the hard part because he’ll sometimes run a program 300-500 times before arriving at the result he wants. He mentioned running a program for 2 weeks before he saw the perfectly rendered design of his liking – a final result that “suspends chaos in a state of harmony… like waiting for that beautiful accident.”

Apple describes Davis as Infinitely Interesting and “abduzeedo’s blog” names him as a design legend. Follow Joshua Davis on

Twitter @joshuadavis or check him out on Flickr.